Frederick douglass and abraham lincoln leadership styles

Analyzing Style and Content, Purpose: Speeches of Lincoln and Frederick Douglass Subjects:

Frederick douglass and abraham lincoln leadership styles

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Revisited Frederick Douglass circa In SeptemberAbraham Lincoln gave notice that he intended to free the slaves held in states still in rebellion against the Union, a promise fulfilled by the Emancipation Proclamation issued on January 1, Lincoln himself remains the subject of scrutiny and celebration as the nation marks the th anniversary of that major step toward the abolition of American slavery.

Frederick douglass and abraham lincoln leadership styles

The book found a wide transatlantic audience and went through many printings, but like most accounts of slave life it fell from favor as memory of the Civil War receded into myth and popular historical narratives tended toward reconciliation.

The book eventually went out of print. In Harvard University Press published the first modern edition of the Narrative, edited and with an Introduction by Benjamin Quarles, a prolific and pioneering African American historian. Introduction by Benjamin Quarles, The publication in of the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass was a passport to prominence for a twenty-seven-year-old Negro.

Up to that year most of his life had been spent in obscurity. Here for four years he turned his hand to odd jobs, his early hardships as a free man being lessened by the thriftiness of his wife. In Augustwhile attending an abolitionist meeting at Nantucket, he was prevailed upon to talk about his recollections of slavery.

His sentences were halting but he spoke with feeling, whereupon the Massachusetts Anti-Slavery Society lost no time in engaging him as a full-time lecturer. For the following four years the young ex-slave was one of the prize speakers of the Society, often traveling the reform circuit in company with the high priests of New England abolitionism, William Lloyd Garrison and Wendell Phillips.

This was all he needed; henceforth his own considerable abilities and the temper of the times would fully suffice to keep him in the limelight. His was among the most eventful of American personal histories.

Favorably endowed in physique, Douglass had the initial advantage of looking like a person destined for prominence. There was a dramatic quality in his very appearance—his imposing figure, his deep-set, flashing eyes and well-formed nose, and the mass of hair crowning his head. An exceptional platform speaker, he had a voice created for public address in premicrophone America.

In speaking he was capable of various degrees of light and shade, his powerful tones hinting at a readiness to overcome faulty acoustics. His rich baritone gave an emotional vitality to every sentence. If nature equipped Douglass for a historic role, nineteenth-century America furnished an appropriate setting.

Douglass came to manhood in a reform-conscious age, from which he was not slow to take his cue. Following the publication of his Narrative he went to the British Isles. There for two years he denounced American slavery before large and sympathetic audiences.

The visits of Douglass and other ex-slaves contributed much to the anti-Confederate sentiment of the British masses during the Civil War. Returning to America in Douglass moved to Rochester, where he launched an abolitionist weekly which he published for sixteen years, a longevity most unusual in abolitionist journalism.

Douglass was a careful editor, insisting on high standards from office assistants and the contributors of weekly newsletters. In addition to speaking and writing, Douglass took part in another of the organized forms of action against slavery—the underground railroad.

Himself a runaway, he was strongly in sympathy with those who made the dash for freedom. One of his newspaper employees related that it was no unusual thing for him, as he came to work early in the morning, to find fugitives sitting on the steps of the printing shop, waiting for Douglass.

Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, Revisited | Harvard University Press

To aid further in the destruction of slavery, Douglass in became a political abolitionist. Hitherto he had been a moral-suasionist, shunning political action.Frederick Douglass And Abraham Lincoln: Control Styles Leadership style defines the way in which and the strategy utilized by a innovator in providing direction, implementing his / her ideas and motivating people towards attainment of a certain goal.

Conversation: Nancy Koehn, PhD ' Forged in Crisis, takes inspiration from Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, and Rachel Carson. Posted on Feb 1, is a historian who studies effective leadership and how leaders, past and present, craft lives of purpose, worth.

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Frederick Douglass And Abraham Lincoln - Leadership Styles The Narrative Of The Life Of Frederick Douglass new topic learning to read and write by frederick douglass.

Parallel Crusaders for Freedom Despite coming from vastly different worlds, both Frederick Douglas and President Abraham Lincoln had similar ideals and beliefs that ignited the beginning of the end of slavery.

Frederick douglass and abraham lincoln leadership styles

Abraham lincoln essay. Pledging to the leadership styles history of digging up dirt on abraham lincoln, a wide selection of into slavery. experience is the best teacher essay Free men and no less guilty than ever before. Jan 25, on abraham lincoln burial springfield: how to start.

Frederick Douglass And Abraham Lincoln: Control Styles Leadership style defines the way in which and the strategy utilized by a innovator in providing direction, implementing his / her ideas and motivating people towards attainment of a certain goal. Frederick Douglass And Abraham Lincoln: Leadership Styles Leadership style defines the manner and the approach employed by a leader in providing direction, implementing his or . Frederick Douglass first met with Mr. Lincoln in the summer of and as he later recalled “saw at a glance the justice of the popular estimate of his qualities expressed in the prefix Honest to the name Abraham Lincoln.”1 Read more ›.

Frederick Douglass first met with Mr. Lincoln in the summer of and as he later recalled “saw at a glance the justice of the popular estimate of his qualities expressed in the prefix Honest to the name Abraham Lincoln.”1 Read more ›.

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