Law and immigrants rights projects

Law - Immigrants' Rights Policy Clinic Faculty listed in alphabetical order — please see faculty specific description for requisite information. Motomura General Course Description: For example, are undocumented immigrants eligible for state-run health care and other public benefits? Are they protected by wage and hour laws and other workplace protections, or is their participation in the workforce subject to criminal penalties?

Law and immigrants rights projects

For example, are undocumented immigrants eligible for state-run health care and other public benefits?

Cases and Projects: | Penn State Law | University Park, Pa.

Are they protected by wage and hour laws and other workplace protections, or is their participation in the workforce subject to criminal penalties? Are local police involved in enforcement of federal immigration laws?

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ACCESS TO COUNSEL RESEARCH ON BEHALF OF THE PENNSYLVANIA IMMIGRANT FAMILY UNITY PROJECT (PAIFUP) Students gain firsthand experience in cutting-edge human rights litigation and advocacy at the local, national, regional, and international levels. HRC draws on international human rights laws and norms, along with domestic law and policy.
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Law - Immigrants' Rights Policy Clinic Lori Nessel and Rebecca Feldmann Offered:
BERKS FAMILY DETENTION CENTER Students will help families understand the purpose of the interview and help them feel comfortable sharing traumatic experiences.

Some state and local governments have taken steps to integrate unauthorized migrants into local and regional communities even though they lack lawful immigration status.

Some states and localities have become involved in immigration enforcement. This extensive state and local activity offers rich opportunities for policy work in a clinical setting.

Clinic projects will involve you directly in law reform, working in teams of several students that will collaborate closely with both professors and nonprofit attorneys at one or more nonprofit organizations based in Los Angeles.

Immigration Law Law offered in the fall or its equivalent is a prerequisite. Assessment This is a graded four-unit course, by letter grade A to F. Half of your grade will be based on class attendance, preparation for class, completion of readings and assignments, and productive engagement in class discussions.

Because this is a small-group, intensive course, your active engagement is essential for both your own learning experience and for the successful functioning of the course as a group enterprise.

Law and immigrants rights projects

Much of your work on Clinic projects can be done on campus, but you will need to travel inside Los Angeles to meet with collaborating attorneys, clients, and other stakeholders. It is very unlikely that your work in this Clinic will include formal appearances before legislative bodies or in court.

Schedule The classroom component will meet for two hours weekly. Work on Clinic projects, in addition to preparing for and attending classroom sessions, will require a substantial time commitment—at least ten hours per week, but often more, depending the timing and urgency of particular matters.

You will work on Clinic projects in teams, organized as much as possible based on your schedules, to maximize opportunities for you to work together without missing any classes. Teams will coordinate and lead a weekly team meeting with the instructors, and students can expect to meet periodically with instructors to assess their acquisition of skills in the clinical setting.

About the Clinic

Please reserve Fridays for meetings with collaborating attorneys, clients, and stakeholders, but unavoidable exceptions may require you to miss sessions of other classes.

Some readings will be from T. Alexander Aleinikoff, David A. Stumpf, Immigration and Citizenship: Process and Policy West 8th ed. Other substantive and skills-focused readings will be on the MyLaw course website. This Clinic is designed to help you gain the following knowledge and skills: You can expect hands-on training in various types of legal writing, including the drafting of legislative texts, legal memoranda, client letters, and press releases and other communications materials, and possibly briefs and other litigation documents.

You can expect to acquire skills in client interviewing and counseling, in negotiating with allies and adversaries, and in developing strategies for working toward law reform.

The approach to skills development will depend on the substantive topics for each week and their relationship to Clinic projects. These approaches will include in-class discussion of peer editing and instructor editing, as well as mock negotiations and similar role-playing exercises, depending on Clinic projects.The Immigrants Rights Project (IRP) is a national project of the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation with offices in New York and California.

Using targeted impact litigation, advocacy and public outreach, the Project carries on the ACLU’s historic commitment to protecting the civil rights and civil liberties of immigrants.

Impact Litigation and Advocacy Work Students work on a broad range of impact litigation and policy projects. Students have contributed to key litigation to limit the immigration consequences of criminal convictions, and to restrict the government’s ability to detain immigrants for prolonged periods of time.

The NYU Law Immigrant Rights Project is a group of law students committed to the rights of all non-citizens. We partner with community based organizations, including Catholic Charities and New Sanctuary Coalition, to connect law students to their programs, including the Catholic Charities Immigrant Court Helpdesk and NSC's pro se asylum filing clinic and ESL empowerment work.

Human Rights Clinic students are deeply engaged in the practice of law in the international and cross-cultural context of human rights litigation and advocacy at the local, national, and international levels.

The Immigrants Rights Project (IRP) is a national project of the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation with offices in New York and California. Using targeted impact litigation, advocacy and public outreach, the Project carries on the ACLU’s historic commitment to protecting the civil rights and civil liberties of immigrants.

The Northwest Immigrant Rights Project's Tacoma office provides legal services to nondetained immigrants in the South Sound region and immigrant detainees at the Northwest Detention Center (NWDC), which holds up to detainees, 90% of whom are unrepresented.

Human Rights Clinic | University of Miami School of Law